Unsealed cable openings are a big problem in Data Centres

Data Centre Floor Tiles are responsible for maintaining the static pressure in the plenum under your Data Centre raised floor. This plenum contains your Data Centre’s most valuable commodity – Cold Air!

Unsealed Cable Openings
 

But have you ever wondered how much of this commodity you are wasting as a result of unsealed cable openings? Do the maths and you’ll be surprised on the equivalent number of floor tiles your Data Centre floor has missing.

The Maths

  1. Count up the number of unsealed openings in your Data Centre floor.
  2. Measure the width and length of one of your cable openings in millimeters (this is important), and multiply these together to get the squared area.
  3. Then do the same again with a few more openings, to get a good sample. Total up the squared areas and divide the resulting figure by the number of openings sampled to get an average size.
  4. Take this averaged cable opening size and muliply it by the number of openings in your Data Centre floor.
  5. This gives you a big figure!
  6. Divide this figure by 360,000 (This is the squared area of a 600mm x 600mm Data Centre floor tile). The resulting figure is the equivalent number of floor tiles your Data Centre has missing.

For Example – If Company X’s Data Centre has 200 unsealed openings in its Data Centre floor, and each of these openings measures 120mm x 150mm, the squared area of the opening is 18,000mm. Multiple this by 200 and you get an area of 3,600,000mm. Divide this by 360,000 and it equates to 10 missing floor tiles!

So ask yourself the question – Would I leave this number of floor tiles out of my Data Centre floor?

If your answer is No, then it’s time to seal your cable openings with KoldLok raised floor grommets and recapture your Data Centre’s biggest commidity.

If you would like help in improving your Data Centre’s airflow efficiency, and improving the overall airflow management then contact our airflow specialists.

Share this post

Blog Catgeories

Blog Archives